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San Agustín Vineyards

San Agustín Vineyards wines exhibit a terroir driven craft. This is the time-honored method of combining soil, slope, sun exposure, with a nod to the gods of weather that let the grape varieties show their unique characteristics. San Agustín Vineyards produces its fruit for wines by being stewards of nature. We ensure the quality of our fruit while ensuring the quality of the land which produces exceptionally high quality wine grapes showing our love for San Diego County. What makes any wine is the fruit from which it was made. Our vineyards grow the fruit showcasing the way of the land. San Agustín Vineyards gives you San Diego wines.
San Agustín Vineyards estate grown grapes include:
Chardonnay
Chardonnay

A green-skinned grape variety used in the production of white wine. The Chardonnay grape itself is neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the wine being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. Chardonnay wine tends to be medium to light body with noticeable acidity and flavors of green plum, apple, and pear. Due to the wide range of styles, it has the potential to be paired with a diverse spectrum of food types. It is most commonly paired with roast chicken and other white meats such as turkey. Heavily oak influenced Chardonnays do not pair well with more delicate fish and seafood dish.

Malbec
Malbec

The grapes tend to have an inky dark color and robust tannins, and are known as one of the six grapes allowed in the blend of red Bordeaux wine. The Malbec grape is a thin-skinned grape and needs more sun and heat than either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot to mature. As a varietal, Malbec creates a rather inky red (or violet), intense wine, so it is also commonly used in blends, such as with Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon to create the red French Bordeaux claret blend. Malbec becomes softer with a plusher texture and riper tannins. The wines tend to have juicy fruit notes with violet aromas. In very warm regions of Argentina and Australia, the acidity of the wine may be too low which can cause a wine to taste flabby and weak. Malbec grown in Washington state tends to be characterized by dark fruit notes and herbal aromas.

Merlot
Merlot

Merlot is a dark blue–colored wine grape variety, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. Merlot is one of the primary grapes used in Bordeaux wine, and it is the most widely planted grape in the Bordeaux wine regions. Merlot is also one of the most popular red wine varietals in many markets. Merlot thrives in cold soil, particularly ferrous clay. The vine tends to bud early which gives it some risk to cold frost. A characteristic of the Merlot grape is the propensity to quickly overripen once it hits its initial ripeness level, sometimes in a matter of a few days. As a varietal wine, Merlot can make soft, velvety wines with plum flavors. While Merlot wines tend to mature faster than Cabernet Sauvignon, some examples can continue to develop in the bottle for decades.

Cabernet Franc
Cabernet Franc

A varietal lighter than Cabernet Sauvignon, making a bright pale red wine that contributes finesse and lends a peppery perfume to blends with more robust grapes. Cabernet Franc is very similar to Cabernet Sauvignon, but buds and ripens at least a week earlier. This trait allows the vine to thrive in slightly cooler climates than Cabernet Sauvignon. Adapting to a wide variety of vineyard soil types, it seems to thrive in sandy, chalk soils, producing heavier, more full bodied wines there. Terroir based differences can be perceived between wines made from grapes grown in gravel versus limestone slopes. The grape is highly yield sensitive, with over-cropping producing wines with more green, vegetal notes.

Cabernet Sauvignon
Cabernet Sauvignon

One of the world's most widely recognized red wine grape varieties. It is grown in nearly every major wine producing country among a diverse spectrum of climates. he classic profile of Cabernet Sauvignon tends to be full-bodied wines with high tannins and noticeable acidity that contributes to the wine's aging potential. In cooler climates, Cabernet Sauvignon tends to produce wines with blackcurrant notes that can be accompanied by green bell pepper notes, mint and cedar which will all become more pronounced as the wine ages. In more moderate climates the blackcurrant notes are often seen with black cherry and black olive notes while in very hot climates the currant flavors can veer towards the over-ripe and "jammy" side.

Malvasia Bianca
Malvasia Bianca

Malvasia family of grapes are of ancient origin, most likely originating in Crete, Greece. These grapes are used to produce white (and more rarely red) table wines, dessert wines, and fortified wines of the same name, or are sometimes used as part of a blend of grapes, such as in Vin Santo. Malvasia tends to prefer dry climates with vineyards planted on sloping terrain of well-drained soils. In damp conditions, the vine can be prone to developing various grape diseases such as mildew and rot. The rootstock is moderately vigorous and capable of producing high yields if not kept in check. Most varieties of Malvasia are derived from Malvasia bianca which is characterized by its deep color, noted aromas and the presence of some residual sugar.

Syrah
Syrah

The style and flavor profile of wines made from Syrah are influenced by the climate where the grapes are grown with moderate climates tending to produce medium to full-bodied wines with medium-plus to high levels of tannins and notes of blackberry, mint and black pepper. In hot climates, Syrah is more consistently full-bodied with softer tannin, jammier fruit and spice notes of licorice, anise and earthy leather. In many regions the acidity and tannin levels of Syrah allow the wines produced to have favorable aging potential. Wines made from Syrah are often powerfully flavoured and full-bodied. The variety produces wines with a wide range of flavor notes. Aroma characters can range from violets to dark berries, chocolate, and black pepper. No one aroma can be called typical though blackberry, coffee and pepper are often noticed.